SELF-WINDING

Preowned Automatic Watches

Are you looking for a mechanical watch without the tedious need for regular hand-winding? Look no further than an automatic watch!

Investing in a luxury automatic watch brings forth a myriad of benefits. Crafted with meticulous attention to detail, these timepieces showcase superior craftsmanship and embody the pinnacle of horological artistry. With their high-quality mechanical movements, luxury automatic watches offer exceptional accuracy, ensuring reliable timekeeping.

Owning a luxury automatic watch carries a sense of prestige and heritage, symbolizing refined taste and a connection to a rich horological legacy. Some luxury automatic watches may even appreciate in value over time, making them not only stylish accessories but potential investments. With timeless designs that effortlessly complement various outfits and occasions, these watches exude a sense of enduring style.

Shop our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches and choose from a variety of renowned watch brands and styles to find the perfect piece for you.

Time in Motion: A Brief History of Automatic Watch Movements

Automatic watch movements, also known as self-winding or mechanical automatic movements, have a rich history that dates back several centuries. The development of automatic movements revolutionized the watch industry by eliminating the need for manual winding, making watches more convenient and accurate for their wearers. Let's explore the brief history of automatic watch movements.

Swiss watchmaker Abraham-Louis Perrelet is largely credited for inventing a self-winding movement in 1777. The movement used an oscillating weight that moved up and down. Perrelet sold some of his watches to Abraham-Louis Breguet around 1780, who is said to have improved upon the mechanism. Breguet called his self-winding watches "perpetuelles," which is French for perpetual.

These early attempts at making automatic watch movements were a significant step forward in watchmaking technology, although it did not gain widespread popularity at the time.

In the early 20th Century, British watchmaker John Harwood patented a self-winding wristwatch design. Harwood's invention incorporated a centrally pivoted weight that swung (approximately 230 degrees between sprung buffers) with the motion of the wearer’s arm. The first Harwood watch was officially presented in 1926 at the Basel Trade Fair.

Following Harwood's invention, many watch manufacturers began exploring and refining the automatic winding concept. In the 1930s and 1940s, companies such as Rolex, Tissot, and Eterna made significant advancements in automatic watch technology.

A few years later, Rolex played a crucial role in the development and popularization of automatic movements. Rolex created an automatic movement with a “rotor” that swung 360 degrees and the company called it the Perpetual movement. In 1931, Rolex introduced the Oyster Perpetual watch, which combined the company’s patented waterproof “Oyster” case with its “Perpetual” automatic movement. This laid the foundation for the modern automatic watch and set the standard for reliability and precision in the industry.

Over the years, watchmakers continued to refine automatic movements, introducing new features and improvements. One notable advancement was the introduction of the automatic chronograph movement in the late 1960s. Companies like Heuer (now TAG Heuer), Zenith, and Seiko developed automatic movements with integrated chronograph functions, combining the convenience of self-winding with the precision timing of a chronograph.

In the late 20th century, with the advent of quartz watches, automatic movements faced significant competition. Quartz watches offered superior accuracy, affordability, and convenience, threatening the relevance of traditional mechanical watches. However, enthusiasts and collectors maintained an appreciation for the craftsmanship and mechanical complexity of automatic movements.

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in mechanical watches, including automatic movements. Watch manufacturers continue to innovate and create new variations of automatic movements, incorporating modern materials, advanced manufacturing techniques, and enhanced features.

Today, automatic watch movements are revered for their artistry, precision, and the connection they provide with horological traditions. They are often seen as a symbol of luxury, style, and heritage, appealing to watch connoisseurs and enthusiasts who appreciate the mechanical intricacies of these timepieces.

In conclusion, the history of automatic watch movements spans several centuries, from the early inventions of Perrelet and Breguet to the designs of Harwood and Rolex in the 20th Century to the modern advancements made by current watch manufacturers. The evolution of automatic movements has transformed the watch industry and continues to captivate watch enthusiasts worldwide.

What is an Automatic Watch?

A watch movement is the engine of a timepiece, and a mechanical movement is the most traditional movement type. Mechanical watches get their power from wound-up mainsprings. While a manual-winding watch requires the wearer to routinely wind the crown to tightly coil the mainspring to store energy, an automatic watch is self-winding as long as it's moving. This is due to a rotor that’s fitted into the watch movement that moves freely with the motion of the wearer’s wrist.

As the rotor moves, it serves to wind the mainspring, thereby generating stored energy for the watch. This is why an automatic watch will continue to run as long as you wear it – or store it in a watch winder (that keeps the watch moving) while you’re not wearing it. Automatic watches, which are also known as self-winding watches, can also be hand-wound from the crown if necessary, such as when it has run out of power.

A watch’s power reserve is how much energy it can store on one full wind. In other words, it is how long a watch can keep working before it runs out of power. Depending on the specific movement, most modern automatic mechanical watches have a power reserve of between 36 and 72 hours. However, some self-winding watches have longer power reserves (eight to ten days, for example) thanks to multiple mainsprings inside the movement. Some automatic watches also include a power reserve indicator on the dial so the wearer can keep track of when the watch may be in danger of running out of energy.

Many luxury watches today rely on automatic movements. Abraham-Louis Breguet is credited for inventing the world’s first self-winding pocket watch in 1780 called the Perpétuelle. While Rolex did not invent the system, Rolex did popularize automatic wristwatches when it introduced the self-winding Oyster Perpetual watch in 1931, equipped with a “perpetual” rotor. Automatic chronograph watches began appearing in 1969 thanks to the pioneering efforts of brands such as Zenith, Breitling, TAG Heuer, Hamilton, and Seiko.

All top-tier timepiece brands today, whether Patek Philippe, Audemars Piguet, Cartier Jaeger-LeCoultre, or others, offer several self-winding watch models in their catalogs.

The perfect bridge between the traditions of mechanical watchmaking and the modern convenience of self-winding capabilities, automatic watches have grown to become highly popular models in the luxury watch landscape.

Exploring the Key Components of Automatic Watch Movements

Automatic watch movements are intricate mechanisms consisting of several key components that work together to power the timekeeping functions. Here are the essential components of automatic watch movements:

Mainspring: The mainspring is a long, coiled spring that stores potential energy when wound. It is the primary power source of the watch, gradually releasing the stored energy to drive the movement.

Rotor: The rotor is a weighted disc that rotates with the movement of the wearer's wrist. As the rotor spins, it transfers energy to the mainspring through a series of gears, effectively winding the watch.

Gear Train: The gear train consists of a set of gears that transmit energy from the mainspring to various parts of the movement, regulating the motion and timekeeping functions. It includes the center wheel, third wheel, fourth wheel, and escapement wheel.

Escapement: The escapement is a critical component responsible for regulating the release of energy from the mainspring. It consists of the escapement wheel, anchor, and pallet fork. The escapement allows the controlled release of energy, ensuring the consistent and accurate movement of the watch hands.

Balance Wheel: The balance wheel is a wheel with a weighted rim that oscillates back and forth, creating the familiar ticking motion of the watch. It is regulated by the escapement and ensures the accurate measurement of time.

Balance Spring: The balance spring, also known as the hairspring, is a delicate spiral spring that is attached to the balance wheel. It helps control the oscillations of the balance wheel, providing the necessary stability and precise timing.

Jewel Bearings: To reduce friction and wear, automatic movements incorporate jewel bearings made of synthetic rubies or other hard materials. These jewels serve as pivot points for the gears, reducing friction and ensuring smoother operation.

Setting Mechanism: The setting mechanism allows the wearer to adjust the time and other functions of the watch. It typically includes a crown, stem, and gears that connect to the hands, allowing for time setting and winding.

Bridges and Plates: Automatic movements feature a series of bridges and plates that provide structural support and organization for the various components. These metal plates hold the gears, jewels, and other elements in place, creating a robust and stable framework.

Automatic Module: In many automatic movements, there is a separate module that contains the winding mechanism, including the rotor, gears, and winding wheels. This module is often placed on top of the base movement, making it possible to retrofit automatic features into existing manual-winding movements.

These key components work in harmony within an automatic watch movement, converting energy from the mainspring into precise and accurate timekeeping. Their intricate interplay showcases the artistry and craftsmanship involved in the creation of mechanical watches.

Why Preowned Automatic Watches Are a Smart Investment?

Investing in a luxury watch can be a smart move, but it can also come with a hefty price tag. That's where pre-owned automatic watches come in. Not only can preowned pieces be more affordable, but they can also offer unique benefits that new watches may not. In this guide, we'll explore the advantages of buying pre-owned automatic watches and what to look for when making your purchase.

The Value of Pre-Owned Automatic Watches

Pre-owned automatic watches offer a unique value proposition for watch enthusiasts and collectors. Select models are more affordable than new watches, which can greatly eliminate future depreciation.

However, it’s important to note that not all pre-owned automatic watches are less expensive than brand new ones – some are, in fact, more expensive given their rarity and collectability. That’s good news for those looking to sell popular preowned self-winding watches for more than they paid for them. It’s no secret that some high-end timepieces retain their value well, making them a smart investment for those looking to add to their collection or resell in the future.

Finding a future collectible can be highly valuable when shopping for used automatic watches. Watches can eventually become collector’s items if they’re rare, prized for their designs and mechanics, or historically important. While there are no hard-and-fast rules on what will make a watch valuable in the future, having knowledge about watch brands, watch history, and current watch trends can make it easier to spot future collectibles or sleeper hits.

When purchasing a pre-owned automatic watch, it's important to do your research and buy from a reputable seller to ensure the authenticity and quality of the timepiece.

The Benefits of Buying Second-Hand Luxury Timepieces

There are many benefits to buying pre-owned automatic watches, especially when it comes to luxury timepieces. For one, they can (but not always) be more affordable than buying new, allowing collectors to add to their collections without breaking the bank.

Additionally, pre-owned watches often have a unique history and character that new watches may not have, adding to their value and appeal. Another benefit of buying automatic watches from the secondary market is the wider variety. Unlike the retail market, the pre-owned market for watches includes vintage, discontinued, and current models, not to mention unique pieces and hard-to-find references.

Some luxury watches retain their value well so buying preowned can be a clever investment strategy for those looking to resell in the future. Regardless of which specific watch you choose, it’s always imperative that you only buy from a reputable source so that you can trust the authenticity and quality of their preowned watches for sale.

How to Choose the Right Pre-Owned Automatic Watch

When choosing a preowned automatic watch, there are a few key factors to consider. First, make sure to buy from a trustworthy dealer that can provide documentation of the watch's authenticity and history.

It's also important to consider the condition of the watch, including any scratches or damage, and whether it has been serviced recently. Reputable sellers will always disclose if any original watch parts have been replaced with newer ones, or if any extensive work has had to be done to the timepiece. Finally, think about your personal style and preferences, as well as the brand and model of the watch, to ensure it's a good fit for you, your lifestyle, and your collection.

Key Considerations When Evaluating Automatic Movement Quality

When assessing the quality of automatic watch movements, several key metrics are considered. These metrics provide insights into the craftsmanship, performance, and reliability of the movement. Here are some important metrics used to measure the quality of automatic movements:

Accuracy: Accuracy refers to the precision with which the movement keeps time. It is measured by comparing the watch's displayed time against a known accurate reference over a specific period. Higher-quality automatic movements are designed to maintain accurate timekeeping within acceptable tolerances, typically expressed in seconds per day.

Power Reserve: The power reserve indicates how long the watch can run autonomously after being fully wound. It is measured in hours and reflects the efficiency of the mainspring and the energy management of the movement. A longer power reserve is generally indicative of a higher-quality movement.

Finishing and Decoration: The finishing and decoration of the movement's components are essential indicators of quality and craftsmanship. Fine watch movements often feature intricate hand-polished surfaces, chamfered edges, Geneva stripes, perlage, and blued screws. These decorative elements showcase attention to detail and enhance the aesthetics of the movement.

Number of Jewels: Jewels, typically synthetic rubies, are used as bearings in watch movements to reduce friction and enhance durability. The number of jewels in a movement is often considered a measure of quality. Higher-quality automatic movements tend to have more jewels strategically placed at key friction points.

Beat Rate: The beat rate, measured in beats per hour (BPH) or vibrations per hour (vph), indicates the frequency at which the balance wheel oscillates. A higher beat rate, such as 28,800 or 36,000 BPH, is generally associated with smoother motion and potentially better accuracy.

Movement Complexity: The complexity of the movement can be an indicator of quality. More intricate movements often require higher levels of expertise and craftsmanship to design and assemble. Complications, such as chronograph functions, moon phases, and perpetual calendars, add to the complexity and sophistication of the movement.

Complications: Complications refer to additional functions or features beyond the basic timekeeping of an automatic movement. Complications can include calendar displays, dual time zones, power reserve indicators, moon phases, tourbillons, and more. The quality of complications can vary, and well-executed complications with smooth operation and accurate performance often contribute to the overall quality of the movement.

Shock Resistance: A high-quality automatic movement should be designed to withstand shocks and impacts, ensuring reliable timekeeping even in active lifestyles. Shock-resistant features, such as anti-shock systems or Incabloc systems, protect delicate components from damage caused by sudden movements or accidental drops.

Brand Reputation and Heritage: The reputation and heritage of the watch brand can also influence the perceived quality of an automatic movement. Brands known for their expertise in horology, heritage, and adherence to strict quality standards often produce movements that are highly regarded.

Serviceability: The serviceability of an automatic movement is an important aspect of its quality. A high-quality movement should be designed and engineered in a way that allows for easy maintenance and servicing. Serviceability includes factors such as accessibility of components, availability of spare parts, and the expertise required to service and repair the movement. A well-designed movement that can be efficiently serviced contributes to the longevity and reliability of the watch.

These metrics collectively contribute to evaluating the quality and performance of automatic watch movements. It's important to note that the interpretation and weight given to these metrics may vary depending on individual preferences, brand reputation, and the intended purpose of the watch.

Caring for Your Preowned Automatic Watch

Once you've invested in a pre-owned automatic watch, it's important to take proper care of it to ensure it lasts for years to come. This includes regular maintenance, such as cleaning and oiling the movement, as well as storing the watch properly when not in use. It's also important to avoid exposing the watch to extreme magnetism, temperatures, or water depths – unless it's specifically designed for diving or other water activities. By taking good care of your pre-owned automatic watch, you can enjoy its beauty and functionality for many years to come.

Indulge in Mechanical Elegance: Explore Our Handpicked Collection of Preowned Automatic Watches

Our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches is comprised of a vast array of designs and brands to suit every taste. From timeless classics to bold, modern statement pieces, each timepiece in our collection has been thoroughly examined by our team of specialists to ensure that it is in pristine condition and ready to be worn and enjoyed. With Patek Philippe, Rolex, Vacheron Constantin, Breguet, and other brands and styles, our collection of used luxury automatic watches has something for everyone.

Shop our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches from a variety of renowned watch brands and designs to find the ideal timepiece.

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ROLEX

Sea-Dweller 4000, REF. 16600
Regular Price
$10,950.00
Sale Price
$10,950.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Submariner Kermit Bertolli 'MK I' Flat 4, REF. 16610LV
Regular Price
$25,500.00
Sale Price
$25,500.00
Regular Price
$22,500.00
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Milgauss Blue Dial, REF. 116400GV
Regular Price
$12,000.00
Sale Price
$12,000.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

AUDEMARS PIGUET

Royal Oak Offshore Chronograph, REF. 26238TI.OO.2000TI.01
Regular Price
$48,900.00
Sale Price
$48,900.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Daytona Zenith Movement, REF. 16523
Regular Price
$16,500.00
Sale Price
$16,500.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Daytona Black Dial, REF. 116520
Regular Price
$27,800.00
Sale Price
$27,800.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Daytona Zenith Movement, REF. 16518
Regular Price
$35,500.00
Sale Price
$35,500.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

VACHERON CONSTANTIN

Bumper Automatic 18K Yellow Gold, REF. 6265
Regular Price
$8,500.00
Sale Price
$8,500.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

BREGUET

Marine Sapphire & Diamond Set, REF. 3401BA/52/196
Regular Price
$12,850.00
Sale Price
$12,850.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

IWC

Ingenieur Automatic, REF. 766 A
Regular Price
$6,200.00
Sale Price
$6,200.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Submariner Date, REF. 16610
Regular Price
$11,550.00
Sale Price
$11,550.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Explorer II Black Dial, REF. 16570
Regular Price
$9,250.00
Sale Price
$9,250.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

PATEK PHILIPPE

Gondolo Annual Calendar, REF. 5135G-010
Regular Price
$35,000.00
Sale Price
$35,000.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

FRANCK MULLER

Master Banker Havana Three Time Zone, REF. 5850 MB HV
Regular Price
$9,000.00
Sale Price
$9,000.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

PATEK PHILIPPE

Grand Complications Perpetual Calendar Retrograde, REF. 5059-001
Regular Price
$52,500.00
Sale Price
$52,500.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

PATEK PHILIPPE

Pilot Travel Time White Gold, REF. 5524G-001
Regular Price
$54,700.00
Sale Price
$54,700.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Yacht-Master Midsize, REF. 168622
Regular Price
$9,200.00
Sale Price
$9,200.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Explorer II White Dial, REF. 16570
Regular Price
$10,300.00
Sale Price
$10,300.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Submariner No Date Cerachrom Bezel, REF. 114060
Regular Price
$14,500.00
Sale Price
$14,500.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Cosmograph Daytona White Dial, REF. 116500LN
Regular Price
$39,000.00
Sale Price
$39,000.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Daytona White Dial, REF. 116520
Regular Price
$26,750.00
Sale Price
$26,750.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Sea-Dweller Cerachrom Bezel, REF. 126600
Regular Price
$17,800.00
Sale Price
$17,800.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Submariner Hulk, REF. 116610LV
Regular Price
$20,750.00
Sale Price
$20,750.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

ROLEX

Submariner Kermit MK VI, REF. 16610LV
Regular Price
$18,950.00
Sale Price
$18,950.00
Regular Price
Unit Price
per 

Time in Motion: A Brief History of Automatic Watch Movements

Automatic watch movements, also known as self-winding or mechanical automatic movements, have a rich history that dates back several centuries. The development of automatic movements revolutionized the watch industry by eliminating the need for manual winding, making watches more convenient and accurate for their wearers. Let's explore the brief history of automatic watch movements.

Swiss watchmaker Abraham-Louis Perrelet is largely credited for inventing a self-winding movement in 1777. The movement used an oscillating weight that moved up and down. Perrelet sold some of his watches to Abraham-Louis Breguet around 1780, who is said to have improved upon the mechanism. Breguet called his self-winding watches "perpetuelles," which is French for perpetual.

These early attempts at making automatic watch movements were a significant step forward in watchmaking technology, although it did not gain widespread popularity at the time.

In the early 20th Century, British watchmaker John Harwood patented a self-winding wristwatch design. Harwood's invention incorporated a centrally pivoted weight that swung (approximately 230 degrees between sprung buffers) with the motion of the wearer’s arm. The first Harwood watch was officially presented in 1926 at the Basel Trade Fair.

Following Harwood's invention, many watch manufacturers began exploring and refining the automatic winding concept. In the 1930s and 1940s, companies such as Rolex, Tissot, and Eterna made significant advancements in automatic watch technology.

A few years later, Rolex played a crucial role in the development and popularization of automatic movements. Rolex created an automatic movement with a “rotor” that swung 360 degrees and the company called it the Perpetual movement. In 1931, Rolex introduced the Oyster Perpetual watch, which combined the company’s patented waterproof “Oyster” case with its “Perpetual” automatic movement. This laid the foundation for the modern automatic watch and set the standard for reliability and precision in the industry.

Over the years, watchmakers continued to refine automatic movements, introducing new features and improvements. One notable advancement was the introduction of the automatic chronograph movement in the late 1960s. Companies like Heuer (now TAG Heuer), Zenith, and Seiko developed automatic movements with integrated chronograph functions, combining the convenience of self-winding with the precision timing of a chronograph.

In the late 20th century, with the advent of quartz watches, automatic movements faced significant competition. Quartz watches offered superior accuracy, affordability, and convenience, threatening the relevance of traditional mechanical watches. However, enthusiasts and collectors maintained an appreciation for the craftsmanship and mechanical complexity of automatic movements.

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in mechanical watches, including automatic movements. Watch manufacturers continue to innovate and create new variations of automatic movements, incorporating modern materials, advanced manufacturing techniques, and enhanced features.

Today, automatic watch movements are revered for their artistry, precision, and the connection they provide with horological traditions. They are often seen as a symbol of luxury, style, and heritage, appealing to watch connoisseurs and enthusiasts who appreciate the mechanical intricacies of these timepieces.

In conclusion, the history of automatic watch movements spans several centuries, from the early inventions of Perrelet and Breguet to the designs of Harwood and Rolex in the 20th Century to the modern advancements made by current watch manufacturers. The evolution of automatic movements has transformed the watch industry and continues to captivate watch enthusiasts worldwide.

What is an Automatic Watch?

A watch movement is the engine of a timepiece, and a mechanical movement is the most traditional movement type. Mechanical watches get their power from wound-up mainsprings. While a manual-winding watch requires the wearer to routinely wind the crown to tightly coil the mainspring to store energy, an automatic watch is self-winding as long as it's moving. This is due to a rotor that’s fitted into the watch movement that moves freely with the motion of the wearer’s wrist.

As the rotor moves, it serves to wind the mainspring, thereby generating stored energy for the watch. This is why an automatic watch will continue to run as long as you wear it – or store it in a watch winder (that keeps the watch moving) while you’re not wearing it. Automatic watches, which are also known as self-winding watches, can also be hand-wound from the crown if necessary, such as when it has run out of power.

A watch’s power reserve is how much energy it can store on one full wind. In other words, it is how long a watch can keep working before it runs out of power. Depending on the specific movement, most modern automatic mechanical watches have a power reserve of between 36 and 72 hours. However, some self-winding watches have longer power reserves (eight to ten days, for example) thanks to multiple mainsprings inside the movement. Some automatic watches also include a power reserve indicator on the dial so the wearer can keep track of when the watch may be in danger of running out of energy.

Many luxury watches today rely on automatic movements. Abraham-Louis Breguet is credited for inventing the world’s first self-winding pocket watch in 1780 called the Perpétuelle. While Rolex did not invent the system, Rolex did popularize automatic wristwatches when it introduced the self-winding Oyster Perpetual watch in 1931, equipped with a “perpetual” rotor. Automatic chronograph watches began appearing in 1969 thanks to the pioneering efforts of brands such as Zenith, Breitling, TAG Heuer, Hamilton, and Seiko.

All top-tier timepiece brands today, whether Patek Philippe, Audemars Piguet, Cartier Jaeger-LeCoultre, or others, offer several self-winding watch models in their catalogs.

The perfect bridge between the traditions of mechanical watchmaking and the modern convenience of self-winding capabilities, automatic watches have grown to become highly popular models in the luxury watch landscape.

Exploring the Key Components of Automatic Watch Movements

Automatic watch movements are intricate mechanisms consisting of several key components that work together to power the timekeeping functions. Here are the essential components of automatic watch movements:

Mainspring: The mainspring is a long, coiled spring that stores potential energy when wound. It is the primary power source of the watch, gradually releasing the stored energy to drive the movement.

Rotor: The rotor is a weighted disc that rotates with the movement of the wearer's wrist. As the rotor spins, it transfers energy to the mainspring through a series of gears, effectively winding the watch.

Gear Train: The gear train consists of a set of gears that transmit energy from the mainspring to various parts of the movement, regulating the motion and timekeeping functions. It includes the center wheel, third wheel, fourth wheel, and escapement wheel.

Escapement: The escapement is a critical component responsible for regulating the release of energy from the mainspring. It consists of the escapement wheel, anchor, and pallet fork. The escapement allows the controlled release of energy, ensuring the consistent and accurate movement of the watch hands.

Balance Wheel: The balance wheel is a wheel with a weighted rim that oscillates back and forth, creating the familiar ticking motion of the watch. It is regulated by the escapement and ensures the accurate measurement of time.

Balance Spring: The balance spring, also known as the hairspring, is a delicate spiral spring that is attached to the balance wheel. It helps control the oscillations of the balance wheel, providing the necessary stability and precise timing.

Jewel Bearings: To reduce friction and wear, automatic movements incorporate jewel bearings made of synthetic rubies or other hard materials. These jewels serve as pivot points for the gears, reducing friction and ensuring smoother operation.

Setting Mechanism: The setting mechanism allows the wearer to adjust the time and other functions of the watch. It typically includes a crown, stem, and gears that connect to the hands, allowing for time setting and winding.

Bridges and Plates: Automatic movements feature a series of bridges and plates that provide structural support and organization for the various components. These metal plates hold the gears, jewels, and other elements in place, creating a robust and stable framework.

Automatic Module: In many automatic movements, there is a separate module that contains the winding mechanism, including the rotor, gears, and winding wheels. This module is often placed on top of the base movement, making it possible to retrofit automatic features into existing manual-winding movements.

These key components work in harmony within an automatic watch movement, converting energy from the mainspring into precise and accurate timekeeping. Their intricate interplay showcases the artistry and craftsmanship involved in the creation of mechanical watches.

Why Preowned Automatic Watches Are a Smart Investment?

Investing in a luxury watch can be a smart move, but it can also come with a hefty price tag. That's where pre-owned automatic watches come in. Not only can preowned pieces be more affordable, but they can also offer unique benefits that new watches may not. In this guide, we'll explore the advantages of buying pre-owned automatic watches and what to look for when making your purchase.

The Value of Pre-Owned Automatic Watches

Pre-owned automatic watches offer a unique value proposition for watch enthusiasts and collectors. Select models are more affordable than new watches, which can greatly eliminate future depreciation.

However, it’s important to note that not all pre-owned automatic watches are less expensive than brand new ones – some are, in fact, more expensive given their rarity and collectability. That’s good news for those looking to sell popular preowned self-winding watches for more than they paid for them. It’s no secret that some high-end timepieces retain their value well, making them a smart investment for those looking to add to their collection or resell in the future.

Finding a future collectible can be highly valuable when shopping for used automatic watches. Watches can eventually become collector’s items if they’re rare, prized for their designs and mechanics, or historically important. While there are no hard-and-fast rules on what will make a watch valuable in the future, having knowledge about watch brands, watch history, and current watch trends can make it easier to spot future collectibles or sleeper hits.

When purchasing a pre-owned automatic watch, it's important to do your research and buy from a reputable seller to ensure the authenticity and quality of the timepiece.

The Benefits of Buying Second-Hand Luxury Timepieces

There are many benefits to buying pre-owned automatic watches, especially when it comes to luxury timepieces. For one, they can (but not always) be more affordable than buying new, allowing collectors to add to their collections without breaking the bank.

Additionally, pre-owned watches often have a unique history and character that new watches may not have, adding to their value and appeal. Another benefit of buying automatic watches from the secondary market is the wider variety. Unlike the retail market, the pre-owned market for watches includes vintage, discontinued, and current models, not to mention unique pieces and hard-to-find references.

Some luxury watches retain their value well so buying preowned can be a clever investment strategy for those looking to resell in the future. Regardless of which specific watch you choose, it’s always imperative that you only buy from a reputable source so that you can trust the authenticity and quality of their preowned watches for sale.

How to Choose the Right Pre-Owned Automatic Watch

When choosing a preowned automatic watch, there are a few key factors to consider. First, make sure to buy from a trustworthy dealer that can provide documentation of the watch's authenticity and history.

It's also important to consider the condition of the watch, including any scratches or damage, and whether it has been serviced recently. Reputable sellers will always disclose if any original watch parts have been replaced with newer ones, or if any extensive work has had to be done to the timepiece. Finally, think about your personal style and preferences, as well as the brand and model of the watch, to ensure it's a good fit for you, your lifestyle, and your collection.

Key Considerations When Evaluating Automatic Movement Quality

When assessing the quality of automatic watch movements, several key metrics are considered. These metrics provide insights into the craftsmanship, performance, and reliability of the movement. Here are some important metrics used to measure the quality of automatic movements:

Accuracy: Accuracy refers to the precision with which the movement keeps time. It is measured by comparing the watch's displayed time against a known accurate reference over a specific period. Higher-quality automatic movements are designed to maintain accurate timekeeping within acceptable tolerances, typically expressed in seconds per day.

Power Reserve: The power reserve indicates how long the watch can run autonomously after being fully wound. It is measured in hours and reflects the efficiency of the mainspring and the energy management of the movement. A longer power reserve is generally indicative of a higher-quality movement.

Finishing and Decoration: The finishing and decoration of the movement's components are essential indicators of quality and craftsmanship. Fine watch movements often feature intricate hand-polished surfaces, chamfered edges, Geneva stripes, perlage, and blued screws. These decorative elements showcase attention to detail and enhance the aesthetics of the movement.

Number of Jewels: Jewels, typically synthetic rubies, are used as bearings in watch movements to reduce friction and enhance durability. The number of jewels in a movement is often considered a measure of quality. Higher-quality automatic movements tend to have more jewels strategically placed at key friction points.

Beat Rate: The beat rate, measured in beats per hour (BPH) or vibrations per hour (vph), indicates the frequency at which the balance wheel oscillates. A higher beat rate, such as 28,800 or 36,000 BPH, is generally associated with smoother motion and potentially better accuracy.

Movement Complexity: The complexity of the movement can be an indicator of quality. More intricate movements often require higher levels of expertise and craftsmanship to design and assemble. Complications, such as chronograph functions, moon phases, and perpetual calendars, add to the complexity and sophistication of the movement.

Complications: Complications refer to additional functions or features beyond the basic timekeeping of an automatic movement. Complications can include calendar displays, dual time zones, power reserve indicators, moon phases, tourbillons, and more. The quality of complications can vary, and well-executed complications with smooth operation and accurate performance often contribute to the overall quality of the movement.

Shock Resistance: A high-quality automatic movement should be designed to withstand shocks and impacts, ensuring reliable timekeeping even in active lifestyles. Shock-resistant features, such as anti-shock systems or Incabloc systems, protect delicate components from damage caused by sudden movements or accidental drops.

Brand Reputation and Heritage: The reputation and heritage of the watch brand can also influence the perceived quality of an automatic movement. Brands known for their expertise in horology, heritage, and adherence to strict quality standards often produce movements that are highly regarded.

Serviceability: The serviceability of an automatic movement is an important aspect of its quality. A high-quality movement should be designed and engineered in a way that allows for easy maintenance and servicing. Serviceability includes factors such as accessibility of components, availability of spare parts, and the expertise required to service and repair the movement. A well-designed movement that can be efficiently serviced contributes to the longevity and reliability of the watch.

These metrics collectively contribute to evaluating the quality and performance of automatic watch movements. It's important to note that the interpretation and weight given to these metrics may vary depending on individual preferences, brand reputation, and the intended purpose of the watch.

Caring for Your Preowned Automatic Watch

Once you've invested in a pre-owned automatic watch, it's important to take proper care of it to ensure it lasts for years to come. This includes regular maintenance, such as cleaning and oiling the movement, as well as storing the watch properly when not in use. It's also important to avoid exposing the watch to extreme magnetism, temperatures, or water depths – unless it's specifically designed for diving or other water activities. By taking good care of your pre-owned automatic watch, you can enjoy its beauty and functionality for many years to come.

Indulge in Mechanical Elegance: Explore Our Handpicked Collection of Preowned Automatic Watches

Our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches is comprised of a vast array of designs and brands to suit every taste. From timeless classics to bold, modern statement pieces, each timepiece in our collection has been thoroughly examined by our team of specialists to ensure that it is in pristine condition and ready to be worn and enjoyed. With Patek Philippe, Rolex, Vacheron Constantin, Breguet, and other brands and styles, our collection of used luxury automatic watches has something for everyone.

Shop our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches from a variety of renowned watch brands and designs to find the ideal timepiece.

Time in Motion: A Brief History of Automatic Watch Movements

Automatic watch movements, also known as self-winding or mechanical automatic movements, have a rich history that dates back several centuries. The development of automatic movements revolutionized the watch industry by eliminating the need for manual winding, making watches more convenient and accurate for their wearers. Let's explore the brief history of automatic watch movements.

Swiss watchmaker Abraham-Louis Perrelet is largely credited for inventing a self-winding movement in 1777. The movement used an oscillating weight that moved up and down. Perrelet sold some of his watches to Abraham-Louis Breguet around 1780, who is said to have improved upon the mechanism. Breguet called his self-winding watches "perpetuelles," which is French for perpetual.

These early attempts at making automatic watch movements were a significant step forward in watchmaking technology, although it did not gain widespread popularity at the time.

In the early 20th Century, British watchmaker John Harwood patented a self-winding wristwatch design. Harwood's invention incorporated a centrally pivoted weight that swung (approximately 230 degrees between sprung buffers) with the motion of the wearer’s arm. The first Harwood watch was officially presented in 1926 at the Basel Trade Fair.

Following Harwood's invention, many watch manufacturers began exploring and refining the automatic winding concept. In the 1930s and 1940s, companies such as Rolex, Tissot, and Eterna made significant advancements in automatic watch technology.

A few years later, Rolex played a crucial role in the development and popularization of automatic movements. Rolex created an automatic movement with a “rotor” that swung 360 degrees and the company called it the Perpetual movement. In 1931, Rolex introduced the Oyster Perpetual watch, which combined the company’s patented waterproof “Oyster” case with its “Perpetual” automatic movement. This laid the foundation for the modern automatic watch and set the standard for reliability and precision in the industry.

Over the years, watchmakers continued to refine automatic movements, introducing new features and improvements. One notable advancement was the introduction of the automatic chronograph movement in the late 1960s. Companies like Heuer (now TAG Heuer), Zenith, and Seiko developed automatic movements with integrated chronograph functions, combining the convenience of self-winding with the precision timing of a chronograph.

In the late 20th century, with the advent of quartz watches, automatic movements faced significant competition. Quartz watches offered superior accuracy, affordability, and convenience, threatening the relevance of traditional mechanical watches. However, enthusiasts and collectors maintained an appreciation for the craftsmanship and mechanical complexity of automatic movements.

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in mechanical watches, including automatic movements. Watch manufacturers continue to innovate and create new variations of automatic movements, incorporating modern materials, advanced manufacturing techniques, and enhanced features.

Today, automatic watch movements are revered for their artistry, precision, and the connection they provide with horological traditions. They are often seen as a symbol of luxury, style, and heritage, appealing to watch connoisseurs and enthusiasts who appreciate the mechanical intricacies of these timepieces.

In conclusion, the history of automatic watch movements spans several centuries, from the early inventions of Perrelet and Breguet to the designs of Harwood and Rolex in the 20th Century to the modern advancements made by current watch manufacturers. The evolution of automatic movements has transformed the watch industry and continues to captivate watch enthusiasts worldwide.

What is an Automatic Watch?

A watch movement is the engine of a timepiece, and a mechanical movement is the most traditional movement type. Mechanical watches get their power from wound-up mainsprings. While a manual-winding watch requires the wearer to routinely wind the crown to tightly coil the mainspring to store energy, an automatic watch is self-winding as long as it's moving. This is due to a rotor that’s fitted into the watch movement that moves freely with the motion of the wearer’s wrist.

As the rotor moves, it serves to wind the mainspring, thereby generating stored energy for the watch. This is why an automatic watch will continue to run as long as you wear it – or store it in a watch winder (that keeps the watch moving) while you’re not wearing it. Automatic watches, which are also known as self-winding watches, can also be hand-wound from the crown if necessary, such as when it has run out of power.

A watch’s power reserve is how much energy it can store on one full wind. In other words, it is how long a watch can keep working before it runs out of power. Depending on the specific movement, most modern automatic mechanical watches have a power reserve of between 36 and 72 hours. However, some self-winding watches have longer power reserves (eight to ten days, for example) thanks to multiple mainsprings inside the movement. Some automatic watches also include a power reserve indicator on the dial so the wearer can keep track of when the watch may be in danger of running out of energy.

Many luxury watches today rely on automatic movements. Abraham-Louis Breguet is credited for inventing the world’s first self-winding pocket watch in 1780 called the Perpétuelle. While Rolex did not invent the system, Rolex did popularize automatic wristwatches when it introduced the self-winding Oyster Perpetual watch in 1931, equipped with a “perpetual” rotor. Automatic chronograph watches began appearing in 1969 thanks to the pioneering efforts of brands such as Zenith, Breitling, TAG Heuer, Hamilton, and Seiko.

All top-tier timepiece brands today, whether Patek Philippe, Audemars Piguet, Cartier Jaeger-LeCoultre, or others, offer several self-winding watch models in their catalogs.

The perfect bridge between the traditions of mechanical watchmaking and the modern convenience of self-winding capabilities, automatic watches have grown to become highly popular models in the luxury watch landscape.

Exploring the Key Components of Automatic Watch Movements

Automatic watch movements are intricate mechanisms consisting of several key components that work together to power the timekeeping functions. Here are the essential components of automatic watch movements:

Mainspring: The mainspring is a long, coiled spring that stores potential energy when wound. It is the primary power source of the watch, gradually releasing the stored energy to drive the movement.

Rotor: The rotor is a weighted disc that rotates with the movement of the wearer's wrist. As the rotor spins, it transfers energy to the mainspring through a series of gears, effectively winding the watch.

Gear Train: The gear train consists of a set of gears that transmit energy from the mainspring to various parts of the movement, regulating the motion and timekeeping functions. It includes the center wheel, third wheel, fourth wheel, and escapement wheel.

Escapement: The escapement is a critical component responsible for regulating the release of energy from the mainspring. It consists of the escapement wheel, anchor, and pallet fork. The escapement allows the controlled release of energy, ensuring the consistent and accurate movement of the watch hands.

Balance Wheel: The balance wheel is a wheel with a weighted rim that oscillates back and forth, creating the familiar ticking motion of the watch. It is regulated by the escapement and ensures the accurate measurement of time.

Balance Spring: The balance spring, also known as the hairspring, is a delicate spiral spring that is attached to the balance wheel. It helps control the oscillations of the balance wheel, providing the necessary stability and precise timing.

Jewel Bearings: To reduce friction and wear, automatic movements incorporate jewel bearings made of synthetic rubies or other hard materials. These jewels serve as pivot points for the gears, reducing friction and ensuring smoother operation.

Setting Mechanism: The setting mechanism allows the wearer to adjust the time and other functions of the watch. It typically includes a crown, stem, and gears that connect to the hands, allowing for time setting and winding.

Bridges and Plates: Automatic movements feature a series of bridges and plates that provide structural support and organization for the various components. These metal plates hold the gears, jewels, and other elements in place, creating a robust and stable framework.

Automatic Module: In many automatic movements, there is a separate module that contains the winding mechanism, including the rotor, gears, and winding wheels. This module is often placed on top of the base movement, making it possible to retrofit automatic features into existing manual-winding movements.

These key components work in harmony within an automatic watch movement, converting energy from the mainspring into precise and accurate timekeeping. Their intricate interplay showcases the artistry and craftsmanship involved in the creation of mechanical watches.

Why Preowned Automatic Watches Are a Smart Investment?

Investing in a luxury watch can be a smart move, but it can also come with a hefty price tag. That's where pre-owned automatic watches come in. Not only can preowned pieces be more affordable, but they can also offer unique benefits that new watches may not. In this guide, we'll explore the advantages of buying pre-owned automatic watches and what to look for when making your purchase.

The Value of Pre-Owned Automatic Watches

Pre-owned automatic watches offer a unique value proposition for watch enthusiasts and collectors. Select models are more affordable than new watches, which can greatly eliminate future depreciation.

However, it’s important to note that not all pre-owned automatic watches are less expensive than brand new ones – some are, in fact, more expensive given their rarity and collectability. That’s good news for those looking to sell popular preowned self-winding watches for more than they paid for them. It’s no secret that some high-end timepieces retain their value well, making them a smart investment for those looking to add to their collection or resell in the future.

Finding a future collectible can be highly valuable when shopping for used automatic watches. Watches can eventually become collector’s items if they’re rare, prized for their designs and mechanics, or historically important. While there are no hard-and-fast rules on what will make a watch valuable in the future, having knowledge about watch brands, watch history, and current watch trends can make it easier to spot future collectibles or sleeper hits.

When purchasing a pre-owned automatic watch, it's important to do your research and buy from a reputable seller to ensure the authenticity and quality of the timepiece.

The Benefits of Buying Second-Hand Luxury Timepieces

There are many benefits to buying pre-owned automatic watches, especially when it comes to luxury timepieces. For one, they can (but not always) be more affordable than buying new, allowing collectors to add to their collections without breaking the bank.

Additionally, pre-owned watches often have a unique history and character that new watches may not have, adding to their value and appeal. Another benefit of buying automatic watches from the secondary market is the wider variety. Unlike the retail market, the pre-owned market for watches includes vintage, discontinued, and current models, not to mention unique pieces and hard-to-find references.

Some luxury watches retain their value well so buying preowned can be a clever investment strategy for those looking to resell in the future. Regardless of which specific watch you choose, it’s always imperative that you only buy from a reputable source so that you can trust the authenticity and quality of their preowned watches for sale.

How to Choose the Right Pre-Owned Automatic Watch

When choosing a preowned automatic watch, there are a few key factors to consider. First, make sure to buy from a trustworthy dealer that can provide documentation of the watch's authenticity and history.

It's also important to consider the condition of the watch, including any scratches or damage, and whether it has been serviced recently. Reputable sellers will always disclose if any original watch parts have been replaced with newer ones, or if any extensive work has had to be done to the timepiece. Finally, think about your personal style and preferences, as well as the brand and model of the watch, to ensure it's a good fit for you, your lifestyle, and your collection.

Key Considerations When Evaluating Automatic Movement Quality

When assessing the quality of automatic watch movements, several key metrics are considered. These metrics provide insights into the craftsmanship, performance, and reliability of the movement. Here are some important metrics used to measure the quality of automatic movements:

Accuracy: Accuracy refers to the precision with which the movement keeps time. It is measured by comparing the watch's displayed time against a known accurate reference over a specific period. Higher-quality automatic movements are designed to maintain accurate timekeeping within acceptable tolerances, typically expressed in seconds per day.

Power Reserve: The power reserve indicates how long the watch can run autonomously after being fully wound. It is measured in hours and reflects the efficiency of the mainspring and the energy management of the movement. A longer power reserve is generally indicative of a higher-quality movement.

Finishing and Decoration: The finishing and decoration of the movement's components are essential indicators of quality and craftsmanship. Fine watch movements often feature intricate hand-polished surfaces, chamfered edges, Geneva stripes, perlage, and blued screws. These decorative elements showcase attention to detail and enhance the aesthetics of the movement.

Number of Jewels: Jewels, typically synthetic rubies, are used as bearings in watch movements to reduce friction and enhance durability. The number of jewels in a movement is often considered a measure of quality. Higher-quality automatic movements tend to have more jewels strategically placed at key friction points.

Beat Rate: The beat rate, measured in beats per hour (BPH) or vibrations per hour (vph), indicates the frequency at which the balance wheel oscillates. A higher beat rate, such as 28,800 or 36,000 BPH, is generally associated with smoother motion and potentially better accuracy.

Movement Complexity: The complexity of the movement can be an indicator of quality. More intricate movements often require higher levels of expertise and craftsmanship to design and assemble. Complications, such as chronograph functions, moon phases, and perpetual calendars, add to the complexity and sophistication of the movement.

Complications: Complications refer to additional functions or features beyond the basic timekeeping of an automatic movement. Complications can include calendar displays, dual time zones, power reserve indicators, moon phases, tourbillons, and more. The quality of complications can vary, and well-executed complications with smooth operation and accurate performance often contribute to the overall quality of the movement.

Shock Resistance: A high-quality automatic movement should be designed to withstand shocks and impacts, ensuring reliable timekeeping even in active lifestyles. Shock-resistant features, such as anti-shock systems or Incabloc systems, protect delicate components from damage caused by sudden movements or accidental drops.

Brand Reputation and Heritage: The reputation and heritage of the watch brand can also influence the perceived quality of an automatic movement. Brands known for their expertise in horology, heritage, and adherence to strict quality standards often produce movements that are highly regarded.

Serviceability: The serviceability of an automatic movement is an important aspect of its quality. A high-quality movement should be designed and engineered in a way that allows for easy maintenance and servicing. Serviceability includes factors such as accessibility of components, availability of spare parts, and the expertise required to service and repair the movement. A well-designed movement that can be efficiently serviced contributes to the longevity and reliability of the watch.

These metrics collectively contribute to evaluating the quality and performance of automatic watch movements. It's important to note that the interpretation and weight given to these metrics may vary depending on individual preferences, brand reputation, and the intended purpose of the watch.

Caring for Your Preowned Automatic Watch

Once you've invested in a pre-owned automatic watch, it's important to take proper care of it to ensure it lasts for years to come. This includes regular maintenance, such as cleaning and oiling the movement, as well as storing the watch properly when not in use. It's also important to avoid exposing the watch to extreme magnetism, temperatures, or water depths – unless it's specifically designed for diving or other water activities. By taking good care of your pre-owned automatic watch, you can enjoy its beauty and functionality for many years to come.

Indulge in Mechanical Elegance: Explore Our Handpicked Collection of Preowned Automatic Watches

Our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches is comprised of a vast array of designs and brands to suit every taste. From timeless classics to bold, modern statement pieces, each timepiece in our collection has been thoroughly examined by our team of specialists to ensure that it is in pristine condition and ready to be worn and enjoyed. With Patek Philippe, Rolex, Vacheron Constantin, Breguet, and other brands and styles, our collection of used luxury automatic watches has something for everyone.

Shop our collection of preowned luxury automatic watches from a variety of renowned watch brands and designs to find the ideal timepiece.